318 How to Gain Publicity – Mompreneur Rachel Olsen

  • 0
  • May 27, 2015
318 How to Gain Publicity - Mompreneur Rachel Olsen
Listen to the Episode Below

What you will hear in this episode with Rachel Olsen:

  • How to Get More Media Buzz
  • How to Gain Publicity to Grow Your Business
  • How to Get Experts Endorse Your Book
  • How to Get the Media Attention You Deserve

Listen to ReLaunch Show on iPhone or Android App

More about our featured guest Rachel Olsen (click bar below)

More about our featured guest

Founder, BestMomProducts.com | The Media Strategist for Mom Entrepreneurs |#1 Amazon Best-Selling Author | CEO, GetApplr.com

Rachel Olsen is the Founder of Best Mom Products, a digital media consulting firm where mom entrepreneurs learn how to get the media buzz they deserve so they can generate more sales and have the family lifestyle they crave. 

Book

  • Shark Tank MOMpreneurs: Take A Bite Out of Publicity ~ How 5 Inventors Leveraged the Media to Build their Business and How You Can, Too. (endorsed by Barbara Corcoran, Shark Tank)

Online Tools Rachel Mentioned:

Full Transcript (Click bar below)

Full Transcript

[00:00] Joel Boggess: Hi, it's me, Joel.

[00:01] Pei: And this is Pei.

[00:02] Joel: Welcome to ReLaunch. One of the best shows you'll ever hear for authors, podcasters, and content creators. And this is the podcast dedicated to helping you develop entrepreneurial confidence, maximize your visibility, and of course, something we all need, and that is to grow our business. And if you're a frequent listener or an insider, welcome back and thank you for tuning in to today's show. And if you're new here, just know that you are among friends. And today's promotional partner is myvirtualsalesforce.com. Brandon Schaefer and his team have partnered up with us and they are here to help you get your time back. And they do it by taking the worry out of the hiring and the training details so you can focus on what drives revenue and what grows your business. More on MyVirtualSalesForce a little bit later on in the show and on today, Pei, are you ready for this, this is going to be fun?

[01:08] Pei: I love it.

[01:08] Joel: Barbara Corcoran, most people have heard that name, oh, in the last few years. Barbara Corcoran, of course, of Shark Tank fame. Well, she called this lady's book a “Must Read.” She is our guest. The founder of Best Mom Products and is a wiz at helping mompreneurs to get media buzz so that they can get more exposure, more sales, and, of course, the life and the lifestyle that they want. And her book was a best seller on Amazon and for mompreneurs, it's the ‘must have' book. Or, it's actually a great book to use as a gift to the moms that are in your life. It's called, let me see if I say this right, it's called “Shark Tank MOMpreneurs Take a Bite out of Publicity.” And of course, I'm talking about the incredible Rachel Olsen on ReLaunch today. Rachel, hey, what's up.

[02:07] Rachel Olsen: Hey, thanks for having me on Joel and Pei. I'm excited to be here.

[02:10] Joel: This is going to be fun and thank you for listening to the show. And since you do listen, you know how we roll here. This show is all about the ReLaunch. And when we have our guest on, it's all about the ReLaunch. You know, how they did it. And it's also about becoming known in your niche. Again, how they did it. And you know if we can just go ahead and just jump right into it. We've all experienced numerous launches and relaunches throughout our lives and I generally ask people to zero in on the Relaunch that has been the most transformational for them and then we just unfold the story from there. And we'll do that with you here and in just a few minutes. But, you know what? I can't have you on the show without picking your brain just a little bit. Getting a little bit of quick take away gold if you will. Tell me, how in the world were you able to get a big time name and a personality, Barbara Corcoran, to endorse your book?

[03:10] rachel Olsen: Yeah, you know, it is… I want to say like it's this amazing incredible story, but when it comes down to it, I just asked and I think that that's where so many people get caught up is, “Well, they'll never do this or they'll never say this. They'll never agree to endorse my book.” And I think it's just putting yourself out there and trying and I learned from being in media for so long that you can send out a hundred pitches and maybe you'll get a few but that's just the way it goes. I want to say and I can share more with you later, is I was very strategic about the letter that I wrote to her. And I found about a few things in there that she, you know as I was writing this book, it had one of the women I interviewed for the book, was her first, Barbara's first endorsement, the first season of Shark Tank.

[03:55] Joel: Okay.

[03:56] rachel Olsen: And behind the scenes, I didn't even know this when my book came out, but that woman and her investment, it was Ava the Elephant, Tiffany Krumins, and it's a medical dispenser for kids, it's so cute and great and so when they get medicine, they look at the cute little elephant and it makes a sound, so, they're not thinking about taking their icky medicine. Well, at that time, they were going through an entire rebranding to Medimals is the new name. So, my book launched and a few months later I saw her on Dr. Oz with Barbara and Tiffany, so, I didn't know the behind the scenes. I think that might be one of the reasons is I mean, Barbara's a very strategic woman, if you follow her, if you've watched how she's grown, she's very pro mom entrepreneurs. Mom entrepreneurs was trending hot at the time. I chose with my media background to do a book on Shark Tank Moms for a number of reasons. But, one, from a media perspective, Shark Tank was trending.

[04:48] Joel: Right, sure.

[04:48] rachel Olsen: Yeah, so. You know, I just… I went to her and I explained also my PR background, I managed Larry Ellison's speaking engagements early in my career, I had gone on a few years ago to help a Google executive. So, I had a whole media plan for my book. So, I laid out to her, I'm launching at this event for 500 people. I'm moderating an entrepreneurial panel, here's all the places you'll be mentioned, and so I think that she just saw that it was a very solid plan, and all of the ways that it could help her. And so, my advice is if you want somebody influential to write a testimonial for your book or to get onboard, really think through what's in it for them. And…

[05:28] Pei: Indeed.

[05:29] rachel Olsen: Yeah. And because, you know, you don't want to waste anyone's time. I was shocked… You know, I had no idea. Is she going to read my email? Is her assistant… Barbara is somebody who is very transparent. I literally thought okay, well, now, I'm going to have to start really figuring out, how to get her email address. And I went to her website and her assistant was right there and she said, “Reach out to Gail.” And I literally reached out on a Friday, of a holiday weekend and on Tuesday morning, it was a, she'd love to do it, great. And I was, I mean my jaw dropped. It was definitely one of those moments I will never forget. Like “Wow, that really happened!” You know? “Oh my gosh, this book is now taking on a whole other level than what I had anticipated it taking on.” So it was exciting. Go ahead.

[06:11] Joel: It sounds like it… So you said some key things here, and then we're going to get right into your relaunch right after this but you said you just asked, you got past whatever it was that you needed to get past, if there was something that you needed to get past, and then you asked, but aside from doing that, you also had had a plan put together?

[06:30] Pei: Yeah.

[06:31] Joel: And you also looked at ways that it was going to to benefit her because as you pointed out it was… She's very strategic, you knew that going in, so you wanted to figure out, okay, how am I going to frame this, so this is a no brainer for her? It sounds like that's what you did because you got a very quick response time. So congratulations on that, and having said that if we can back up a little bit, and let's start to get into Rachel's relaunch. We can definitely circle back as we come in for a landing later on in the show to kind of bring this in, back into your book, and to Barbara, but if we talk about Rachel's relaunch, we've all had numerous ones. Which one do we need to zero in on for this conversation?

[07:18] rachel Olsen: Yeah. I think that that one would be when my youngest daughter turned four, and she finally started sleeping through the night. She had been colicky from the time she was a baby, she didn't sleep very well. When I had her, my other daughter who's two years older, went into this deep state of depression, and decided to stop napping, and she needed like a three-hour nap. So I had been kind of living for four years in this, you know, mom with two young children, a baby and a toddler.

[07:46] rachel Olsen: I wasn't sleeping, you know, in retrospect I kind o… I look at it, and it's even hard for me to say this, is that I think I definitely had some sort of postpartum depression, but I just never went to a doctor and my husband was helpful, so it was like I'd get like a week of sleep and I'd feel great and normal and then like this cycle would start all over again, and I think anyone with young children can relate to this, someone's sick or something's going on, so you know during those four years I just felt like I was treading water, and I'm a very type A personality. I like to get things done and I had all these goals and things that I wanted to do and I would consult here and there for a client part-time.

[08:27] rachel Olsen: But I just felt like I couldn't get it together, so when my youngest daughter turned four was in November and I had about two months till that New Year's and I slept, like we were a normal family, everybody was back to sleeping, and I realized I had been in this state for so long and it scared me and I felt like my head was… I had enough energy to do something, and so that New Years we spent with four other couples and their families we all had had our first child together and the kids went to bed. We were sitting around and she had, you wrote out the New Year… She didn't call it a “Resolution”, a New Year's Intention, I think it was.

[09:06] Joel: Okay.

[09:08] rachel Olsen: It was very my friend, and it was great. They pull it out of the vase that she had put it in, and is was like “Rachel”, and I wrote, “This is going to be the Year of Rachel.” and everyone just died laughing. We were like oh my god, the Year of Rachel and I said, you know it is funny to a degree. And I said that, “I feel like I have been just in this world for four years. I'm coming out of it, and I am declaring myself a priority and I want everybody around me, my closest friends, and my husband to know I am making changes this year for me, and I'm making myself just as important as our children, as my husband, and all of the others things that I was giving to, I was on the board of my daughter's preschool and I was just giving so much of myself to everyone around me. That I actually felt like I had a stake of claim into me, for me. And so an amazing thing…

[10:00] Joel: Yeah, hold on. Let me jump in there and let me kinda get into this conversation a little bit. I'm wondering was there anything that you had to get past in your own belief system or in maybe something that other people may have said to you or some of things that might have been said at some earlier time about putting yourself first as a priority because a lot of people understand the importance of that intellectually, but at a heart level or at a emotional level, that's tough.

[10:35] rachel Olsen: Oh it is tough, but I saw my mom who was a stay at home mom, and I had two brothers, and I experienced as a child watching her lose herself to children and she wanted to work. She wanted to do other things and the dynamic was that my father was doing fine financially, and didn't want her working. He was very old school. If you have to work, it means he was doing something wrong. There's so much going on from that perspective and I think that I finally knew, I just saw myself. I saw how it happened to my mom, and I never thought in a million years like I would be able to relate to it from that perspective.

[11:10] rachel Olsen: I thought… And for me I think transformation happens when you're so unhappy or you have a realization of something, and for me it was that realization, and my mom always said, “Work, make yourself a priority.” She would say these things but she just didn't do it for herself. She felt stuck. I recognized that and for me that was like the fear, it was, it was fear based. Wow, it's been four years have gone by. Four years is a long time! I was doing stuff, and accomplishing things but I just wasn't… I could see how it could happen to any mom. I felt like I was always in my mind stronger than that. “That would never happen to me. I'm not going to be the mom in sweatpants or workout clothes for two days or whatever a week.” And it was becoming me and I was actually Feeling okay with it because I just couldn't. It's like, “You know what, I'm putting other people first. This is just how it is.” I think it had something to do with that and I don't think anybody ever said… I think from an emotional perspective I felt like… I had been telling my husband like, “I'm just not myself and I need exercise more.” It was hard for me to ask for help, so for me instead of saying to my husband like, “I need you to watch the kids three nights a week so I can go workout and feel good about myself.”

[12:36] rachel Olsen: It was easier for me to declare it with all of our friends and families saying like, “Hey, I just want you to know everybody, I'm doing this and I just can't take any… ” I can't find out what everybody feels because once if my husband said, ‘”Well, we don't really have time for this or you are important but this is more… ” I felt like I wasn't going to open that door of conversation. I felt like I was at a point where I had to say, “This is what I need and this is what I'm going to do.” And if it doesn't work for some people, we'll find another way to make it through but I'm at the point where something has to change and I saw what that change needed to be and that was the year I signed up to run half a marathon in June and I ran it. That was the year I decided to take some online courses and just get back my mind.

[13:27] Joel: It's okay. Hold on, you're blazing through your whole growth and development here so let me back you up a little bit. Now good job, and congratulations for you to get to that point, Rachel, where you're able to make some of those declarations for yourself to find a space that you were safe enough and comfortable enough and to where you could say that but let me ask you this. You signed up for stuff and then you're on this journey, your Rachel journey. I'm just curious but I don't have enough time today on the show to go over all of the experiences that you went through between then and now but what did you learn or re-learn Rachel, about you and about your possibilities, about your potential, about some of the things that you were then able to go do. What did you learn about you? I think that's what I'm trying to ask.

[14:31] rachel Olsen: I think that I learned that I'm back. I felt kind of this like ‘Rawr' I don't know, I'm not very woo-woo. I just felt like that was the time in my life that was incredible and intense and I feel like… I guess I'm not sure quite how to say this… I felt like I knew I had a lot more to offer or in a different capacity that I was ready to give and that…

[15:06] Joel: What does that mean, you're ready to give? ‘Cause you probably are already, always knew at some level that you have more to offer but then ready to give?

[15:13] rachel Olsen: I was ready to give more… So my background… I'll just backup for a second. So my background's always been in media and marketing and it's always been spotlighting other people and PR and all of that. It was mostly for high-tech and having kids and going through this made me want to give and help other mom entrepreneurs and so for me it was looking at it as. “Okay, how do I take my skills and talents.” and “I want to help moms” I want to help moms who going to start a business because I know what they're going through and it is such a transformative intense period in your life for everyone in different ways and so if I can help somebody who wants to bring their vision and their desire to the world, I know I have those skills to help them and that's where I want to focus on.

[16:05] rachel Olsen: So I think when I say more to give, I realized it was who I wanted to give it to, when I went back in a working capacity instead of necessarily making lots of money, high-tech executives in Silicon Valley, I felt like my give was more towards women like me and validating them and helping them through that process of…

[16:28] rachel Olsen: Great. Very important. Pei you have your…

[16:30] Pei: You hit on a very important word of validating and I'm going to come back to that but I want to ask you first, so that year when you declared… By the way I absolutely love when you declared 'cause it wasn't you asking for permission like, “Hey, I think I should or should I?” You declared. So, did you sign up for half marathon? Did you already know that's the kind of business that you want to get into that year?

[17:08] rachel Olsen: Yes I did, I did know that I wanted to get into that, so yes I did the whole half marathon but I knew I wanted to focus on mom entrepreneurs. Something that I didn't say is that when my second daughter was born, besides being colicky she had something called breathing spells the first year and it's like a small percentage of babies have this. It's an emotional response to leaving them so when I would go put her in her crib for a nap in the middle of the day she would stop breathing and look at me like I was torturing her, and she would turn blue, and she fainted in my arms when I went to go pick her up.

[17:42] rachel Olsen: So long story short, I was terrified, I had been a lifeguard in college, I knew CPR, I had retaken the classes but I panicked because it wasn't any of the normal CPR things. I was like, “Why is she turning blue? Why is this happening?” So, wild enough, my pediatrician, actually her kids had it and so she said, “Oh they outgrow it by a year, which was terrifying enough” So I found this audio CPR kit, because I had panicked and I said, “Well, what if it was this?” So at the time, during this time I was slowly looking into bringing this audio CPR kit to market, and I was… And it was… It gave CPR instructions in 60 seconds for a baby, kid, or an adult. So you can just, if you panic, you open it up and it talks you through it.

[18:20] Joel: Oh, okay.

[18:20] rachel Olsen: So, my dad, it was one of his products, he was in medical supplies and they had sold it to the government, but it had never been a consumer product, so I said, “Oh my God, I need this kit.” And he said, “Oh, you were never interested in it before.” And we had a good laugh about it. And so, I started just marketing it to mom and kids, so it was kind of like that started my process down the mom road.

[18:42] Joel: Okay.

[18:43] rachel Olsen: Really. And so, it was during that time that I was marketing that, that I knew that these were my people now.

[18:53] Joel: Okay, so basically you had a need.

[18:58] rachel Olsen: Right.

[18:58] Joel: And you found a solution to your own need, and then you thought, “Well, wait a minute. Gosh, if me as a mom needs this for my kiddos, well, there's going to be other moms that need this for their kids too.” And so, solving your own problem in a way started this whole wonderful journey for you, did I get that right?

[19:20] rachel Olsen: Yeah, you did. Exactly.

[19:21] Joel: Okay, fantastic. Okay, what I'm going to do, I'm going to come back and I'm going to… We're going to get to the practicality of today's show. And what I'd like you to just lay on us is just tip, after tip, after tip, as far as developing buzz around our products, and also around our services so that we can add a lot of value to the moms that are listening in today. But before I do that I want to talk a minute about today's sponsor. And our sponsor is myvirtualsalesforce.com. And you know, owning a business has many challenges, but with myvirtualsalesforce.com, managing a marketing and sales force doesn't have to be one of them. Our promotional partner, My Virtual Sales Force, they do the heavy lifting for you by hiring, training, and equipping the sales pros so that they will bring in for you two things that every entrepreneur needs, and that's new leads and more sales.

[20:27] Joel: Brandon Schaefer and his team even take care of the healthcare coverage for you. So do yourself, do your business a favor and outsource your worry and give them a try. They'll put together a strategic sales and marketing team tailored to your needs and goals. And you have figured out where to go, it's myvirtualsalesforce.com. Okay, very good. So, Rachel, let's lay it on. Go ahead Pei, you got something?

[20:56] Pei: Yeah. Before you share the tips you have, I just wonder, do you find mom entrepreneurs specifically have certain challenges regarding publicity, media exposure?

[21:10] Joel: Good question.

[21:11] rachel Olsen: Yeah, I actually don't think it's that much of a challenge in that regard, because I think mom entrepreneurs, most of the ones I've worked with, are inventors. And so, I think when you're an inventor, you have a great press opportunity, because you're creating something that hasn't been done before. And so, the mom entrepreneur story, there's so many outlets for that, there's definitely mom bloggers. Huffington Post has a huge women read audience, and you can become a contributor there. So, there's lots of opportunities I find for women entrepreneurs, you don't necessarily have to be a mom, but there are… I think it's actually the opposite, I think mom entrepreneurs to a degree have an easier time, because they know why they created their product. So with PR and press, and anything that you do in marketing, it really comes down to your story. So, I find that they have a very authentic interesting story. It's not trying to come up with, “Here are the features and benefits.” It's more out of passion. And…

[22:10] Joel: Yeah, can…

[22:11] Pei: That's very encouraging to hear.

[22:13] Joel: It really it is. Can you give us an example of someone that you've helped before? Or someone that you're currently helping, so we can really make sure people understand what you're sharing here?

[22:26] rachel Olsen: Sure, I'd love to give some examples. I received great press from using HArachel Olsen, which is a resource, a website called helpareporterout.com. And it connects reporters and sources. You can sign up for free and they'll send you three emails a day with opportunities in which reporters are looking for sources to include in their stories and articles. I have learned that if you can respond quickly, you're more likely to get a response. Also be sure to look up the reporter's name so you can get a feel for how they write. Freelance writers use HArachel Olsen often and that's great for you, because that means they write for a number of different publications, so if they can use you for one story, they may be able to use you for another story in the future.

[23:00] rachel Olsen: One my clients, an interior designer, was consistently responding to inquiries on HArachel Olsen and not getting anywhere. In a few sessions we figured out the right approach she should take, and I explained how to read and interpret some of the HArachel Olsen requests. Shortly after she landed a mention with her company name in a well known home design magazine and the reporter asked if she could come back to her as a known source. So, something like that's the ultimate win, it's a placement, it's a relationship with a freelance reporter who will use her as a source for other magazines. One area we worked on was defining what she did without sounding like every other interior designer who specialized in a style that she called “Redefined Coastal” to a specific expertise. So, one of her expertise was in choosing paint colors, and now she's the go-to color expert. And that's how it happened for her.

[23:45] rachel Olsen: And another area of expertise for her was creating functional and beautiful spaces for young mothers. So, she focused on organizing nurseries and playrooms a lot. I suggested we think outside the box of just home decor magazines to reach her target audience.

[24:01] rachel Olsen: Our new parenting magazine always features a nursery in the front section of their magazine, so she's working on that now. Sometimes it's just looking at the same story through a different lens, so ask yourself where can your story fit in? My advice is to go sit at a bookstore and look through the magazines you want to be in, and get a feel for how they lay them out, which is easy to do. The table of contents will show you the sections they have, so if you notice there's a section that says top seven, or it's a listicle maybe, which is a hybrid of an article on a list, which is very popular these days because people don't want us to be able to go ahead and just take a quick look and see if they want to read more.

[24:39] rachel Olsen: Let's say it says, “Top Seven Unique Gifts for Moms,” and you have a product that fits in this description. Contact the editor, and weave in other unique gifts, so you're making the editor's job easier. Anything you can do to make their job easier will make you stand out. You can also be thinking of looking at advertising packages, you could do that online for each magazine, because they secure advertisers so far in advance, their topics are laid out for a complete year, and so you can see where you'll fit in during that year, and then it's about six to nine months before publication, so the lead time is… So if it's June, you should be contacting editors for holidays; Christmas and New Year's and then it's just about coming up with a strategy and a pitch, and reaching out. For the last year, I've done my own PR around this book, because I was planning on launching a do it yourself PR course, and I have to say that I haven't launched the course because doing your own PR is really hard.

[25:36] rachel Olsen: I know that when you're an entrepreneur, if you don't have the money to spend on a PR firm or to hire somebody like me, which is more reasonable than a PR firm but I'm not usually doing the pitching for you, or trying to figure out that plan and your messaging, and making everything consistent so that they can do their PR. When you do own PR, it's a lot different when I pick up the phone and say, “Hey, I'm the number one best selling author of Shark Tank Mompreneurs.” It feels very low budget and so when I call… I just called to talk to the producer of Fashion Police on E! About her. For me, reaching out to somebody saying, “I'm her publicist. I'm representing her,” I can sell like a crazy woman. I see every benefit she brings, I know how she'll fit into their show. I'll know how to make it newsworthy. All of the these things that are trending I'm aware of, but when it's yourself, it's hard to do.

[26:31] Joel: Okay, talk about newsworthy. We've got about four minutes left, so rather quickly, if you can. Talk about making yourself newsworthy, because that is, because if you're able to do it, that's gold. Sometimes I have a hard time explaining what that actually means. I've been in TV forever, so it's second nature to me, but help me explain making yourself newsworthy, and we'll come in for a landing on that.

[26:58] rachel Olsen: Sure, and I'll give a great resource for that, too. Okay, so what's topical? What is the news covering today, not last week? Start local. It's the easiest way to get coverage when you're starting out. Your city wants to feature the local community, so what are you doing that's newsworthy? Did you just launch? Is it new? Why now? What's your story? Focus in on those things. When I landed a segment on the Arizona ABC evening news for the CPR kit I was marketing at the time, it was timely. It was newsworthy. At the time, a nine year old boy had just saved his sister from drowning by watching an actor on a TV show perform CPR, and his grandma who was watching him and his sister didn't know CPR. A friend of mine posted this incredible story on Facebook, and when it showed up in my feed, I immediately had a light bulb moment. My CPR kit was audio based, and talks someone through CPR, so I contacted the reporter who covered the boys story. I flew out to Arizona, and we filmed a segment about drowning season, as they called it in Arizona in May. It was timely. It was a solution to an immediate problem, and that is newsworthy.

[28:02] rachel Olsen: Unfortunately, when it went to air, something else became more newsworthy. It aired the evening Osama Bin Laden was pronounced dead, so it didn't quite get the oomph or response I had hoped for, but that is because something else became more timely, which was newsworthy. I hope that provides you with a good feel for what newsworthy is. Help a reporter out is a great resource for leads, but it's also great to see what's trending, includes TV. So you'll see some things that are very timely. Another great resource is buzzsumo.com, B-U-Z-Z-S-U-M-O.com. It's a website where you can analyze what content performs better and is trending on social media. You can search by journalist or article to get a better idea of what's newsworthy within a specific timeframe, including the last 24 hours. I hope that gives you a better feel for what's newsworthy, and some good tips.

[28:54] Joel: Absolutely. Gosh, I can go on with story after story of how I've been able to weave myself into the story, and my expertise, and that's what making yourself newsworthy is. Taking the current event that relates to your expertise, your know how, your business, and then just making yourself a part of the story, and then reaching out to the decision makers, and being able to pitch yourself as that expert. Fantastic stuff. I could talk media forever, and you know what, Rachel? I often do. [laughter] Talking with Rachel Olsen today, founder of BestMomProducts.com. Also she's got a best selling book out there, Barbara Corcoran, everyone knows who that is, she says it's a must read. The book is called ‘Shark Tank MOMpreneurs Take a Bite out of Publicity'. Rachel Olsen, you are welcome back here on Relaunch anytime. This has been fantastic. Thanks for sharing your tips, your expertise. Pei, what do you got?

[29:57] Pei: Yeah, and we'll share the link to Rachel's book, and the resources BuzzSumo, other links, tools, in the blog post relaunchshow.com/318.

[30:12] Joel: Have a great day Rachel, all the best.

[30:13] rachel Olsen: Great. You too, thank you. Take care guys.

Connect with Rachel on Twitter, Facebook and her website.

Sponsor: My Virtual Sales Force

Join their FREE Online Event Sharing How You Can Increase Sales & Lower Costs by Outsourcing Your Sales Team

Download a FREE copy of the SUCCESS Summary of "Finding Your Voice" book

About Joel Boggess

Motivational Speaker | Podcast Host | Bestselling Author. I help entrepreneurs focus, build confidence, and drive success with interactive keynotes, workshops, and executive coaching. Together, we create possibilities that bring empowerment, meaning, and financial impact.

Leave a Reply